Syracuse Salted Potatoes

Syracuse Salted Potatoes

Syracuse Salted Potatoes - you'd think they'd be too salty but they're not! They're incredibly creamy and quite a treat!

When I was looking for a side for my Spiedies, I saw a comment on Youtube from a lady who said she always served Salted Potatoes with her Spiedies. I was intrigued. See, I’ve heard of potatoes baked in a salt crust, but this was a new one on me!

Syracuse Salted Potatoes
Syracuse Salted Potatoes – you can just see the fine layer of salt.

They’re a regional specialty from the Syracuse, New York area, dating back to when the Irish salt workers would dunk their potatoes into a basket and lower them into vats of boiling marsh water being processed for the salt. Then they’d have them for lunch. They’re also sold at fairs and events, in baskets with butter for dipping.

Since crazy simple often means crazy good, I had to try them, sodium levels be damned! We loved them, too, and surprisingly didn’t find them too salty. When drained, a fine layer of salt covers each potato and it was the perfect amount.

Syracuse Salted Potatoes
Syracuse Salted Potatoes

Salted Potatoes are super creamy inside and absolutely delicious. That being said, they were “just” a potato…and I did have a bit of a problem with using a huge amount of salt – it didn’t seem to be so frugal, but what the heck, salt IS cheap. And so are potatoes. And I’d do it again.

These potatoes need to be the right size, (size B) one to two inches, and red potatoes seem to be the potato of choice. I used Yukons because that’s what I had in the cupboard, but I think any baby potato would be wonderful. Most recipes seem to use a copious amount of butter, up to a stick per pound. I found 1/2 stick or 4 tablespoons was still generous for two pounds.

Syracuse Salted Potatoes
Syracuse Salted Potatoes

Salted Potatoes

  • Servings: varies
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 2 – 4 pounds baby potatoes, 1 to 2″ in diameter, whole
  • 1 to 1 1/2 cups salt
  • 1 gallon (4 quarts) boiling water
  • butter (about 4 tablespoons for 2 pounds works well)

Bring salt and water to a boil and gently stir to dissolve salt. Add potatoes (they should float if there is enough salt, if not add a little more) and cook 20 to 25 minutes until potatoes are easily pierced with the tip of a sharp knife.

Drain, give the potatoes a quick shake and allow to dry so the salt “crust” forms. While still hot, add to a bowl. Toss with butter and serve. When serving, pass the salty butter from the bottom of the dish to use over the potatoes.

from the kitchen of http://www.frugalhausfrau.com

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And, as I do almost every Friday, I’ll be linking up to Angie’s Fiesta Friday  – this is Number 136, hosted this week by Judi of Cooking with Aunt Juju. Be sure to stop by Saucy Saturdays, too, my fave Saturday party place!

33 thoughts on “Syracuse Salted Potatoes”

  1. How interesting that they float if there is enough salt. It would be fun to give these a try. I’m always up for a new side dish, especially if it is simple!

          1. My hubby caught a 40-inch Chinook salmon, WOO HOO!!! I didn’t get one in, but man we have a lot of salmon to eat now, lol! We had it fresh on Sunday after he cleaned it and chucked the rest in the freezer for future meals. 🙂

            1. I just happen to have a yardstick sitting on my bed – I was using it to fish out the toys Chance has gotten stuck under there! Wow, that’s huge. I’m amazed! I can’t imagine how good it is freshly caught!! 🙂 Sorry you didn’t get one but happy for you anyway!!

    1. There’s something about these small potatoes, too – they almost pop when you bite into them. When I bake potatoes, I always make extra for hash browns…these potatoes were so good, though, the leftovers got all eaten up – which was interesting because they were just as good the second day – no cold fridge flavors…

  2. Holy crap! that’s a lot of salt. One of the reasons I don’t brine is cause, even though salt and sugar are ‘cheap’ I don’t find the flavour/ tenderness difference worth it. And, my potato salting is always hit and miss, I usually under salt, rarely over salt. Still, it’s an interesting technique.

    1. I wouldn’t do it all the time, but they were really, really good – but that begs the question – is it worth it to have a really, really good potato as opposed to a really good potato? If you know what I mean!!

  3. Looks like a fun simple recipe. I like to boil potatoes and do enough so I can have extras. These I slice and pan fry for breakfast the next day.

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